Archive › November, 2005

Wednesday, November 30, 2005

Picture of the Day

Picture of the Day

By Paul Koh

 

Contest Winner

Ancient Contest Winner

by Angela Brauchli

 

Contest Winner

Tool Contest Winner

By Leigh Plowman

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Wednesday, November 30, 2005

Today was an exciting day of photography assignments and thorough instruction.

We took a short trip to a historic homestead with an outstanding variety of photographic subjects.

Some students chose to spend a good deal of time exploring the rooms of the buildings with an array of old tools inside. One could also photograph the open fields with blue skies and knee-high grass, or many animals including horses, chickens, pigs and ducks. The weathered buildings and their furnishings gave fantastic textures, especially in black and white film.

The third session of the course was orientated around controlling the quantity of light entering the film/sensor. We discussed aperture and shutter speed and their reciprocal relationship to one another. Later, ISO speed was included, so that equivalent ISO, aperture and shutter speeds could be explored.

The quality of the images was awesome. Students put a lot of effort into thinking about their images before shooting them. We were also encouraged to explore the emotional impact of the photos. That is, what is the underlying message that we are trying to convey to the reader. Also, would our message provoke a similar emotional response towards further generations? Moreover, each student has learned to recognize the importance of mental construction of images prior to pressing the shutter release.

I felt exhausted after the photo shoot and theory, and will sleep well tonight. However, by Godís grace, I look forward to shooting and maturing even more tomorrow.

—Prizewinning Photography Student Leigh Plowman

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Tuesday, November 29, 2005

Today was the first great day of a great course! We started off with a session on basic camera function—very helpful to a non-tech-genius such as myself. Then we took off to the Maroondah Dam where we each shot 27 exposures. We then learned what we did wrong as the staff mercilessly ripped our photos to shreds (just kidding). Actually they showed us how to logically evaluate each image and showed us practical ways to improve as photographers.

The main thing I got from today was that a tourist takes snapshots whereas a photographer creates images. Big difference. I definitely am excited about this new way to use the super cool tool called a camera.

—Prizewinning Photography Student Shane Felber

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Monday, November 28, 2005

During the first session of IPS I was impacted by the fact that in our ìmass mediaî age, photography and photojournalism are not just recording events of social change and reform. They have become the agents. By capturing the world as it really is—i.e. the worst of human nature, a fallen world, et cetera—we see ourselves as others do, and become an ìoutsider looking in,î able to identify glaring weakness, immeasurable courage, et ceteraÖ In short, the reality of a world groaning for redemption.

—Prizewinning Photography Student Angela Brauchli

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